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Women's Leadership Conference Schedule

Conference Schedule

Wednesday, March 6th

7:00- 8:30 pm.

Kickoff Concert (Panther’s Den) - Free and open to the general public. 

LOUISA BRANSCOMB WITH SPECIAL GUESTS JEANETTE AND JOHNNY WILLIAMS

For this special evening event, performer and songwriting Diva Louisa Branscomb has joined forces with master vocalists-instrumentalists-songwriters Jeanette and Johnny Williams for a blend of originals in the hands of folks that know how to write it, sing it, and deliver it like it’s supposed to be. It's a rare opportunity to see these three icons of bluegrass together, and it promises to be an uplifting blend of heartfelt acoustic and bluegrass that moves and inspires, delivered with taste, skill, and heart. 

Thursday, March 7th - Registration required

 8:30 - 11:00 a.m.

Registration (Franklin Hall Atrium)

8:30 – 11:00 a.m.

Coffee and Continental Breakfast (Franklin Hall Atrium) 

9:30 a.m.

Welcome and Opening Remarks:  (Franklin Hall - Panther’s Den)

Dr. Gail Summer, Dean of Academic Planning and Programs

9:45 - 10:45 a.m.

OPENING SESSION:  (Franklin Hall - Panther’s Den)

Louisa Branscomb –Ph.D., clinical psychologist, songwriter, and bluegrass musician

 BAD GIRLS AND BANJOS: BREAKING THE WRONG RULES THE RIGHT WAY

 Louisa Branscomb’s creative journey as a psychologist, composer and musician has earned her one critic's summation as “fearless and peerless.”  She formed the first modern all-woman bluegrass band, and was one of the first women to organize and front a successful nationally touring bluegrass band, one of the first women to play banjo in a touring bluegrass band, one of the first widely recognized female songwriters in bluegrass and roots music, and has been seminal in organizing the songwriting community in bluegrass and roots music. In psychology, she was one of the first to write about concepts such as psychological surrender and spiritual aspects of trauma, and one of the first to research the connection between childhood abuse and traumatic stress in adulthood.  In “Bad Girls and Banjo’s: Breaking the Wrong Rules the Right Way,” Dr. Branscomb will share her experiences as a woman in uncharted territory, challenges she has faced, and the most valuable lessons she has learned from successes and mistakes along the way. Using live music, poetry, and insights from her new work in transformational psychology and creative expression, Dr. Branscomb will go beyond lists and lessons to invite you to share in the experience of facing the unknown with creativity and conscience.

Introduction by Christine Stinson 

11:00 - 12:00 noon

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:  (Franklin Hall – Panther’s Den) 

Liliana Madrigal – Senior Director of Program Operations, Amazon Conservation Team

 WOMEN OF THE COLOMBIAN AMAZON: THEIR ROLE IN THE HEALTH OF THEIR COMMUNITIES

Most of the research on indigenous peoples of the Amazon has focused on the men. Even studies on the ethnomedicine of these groups focus on the men as most of the shamans are males. Nonetheless, indigenous women play a vital role in the transfer, strengthening and use of medicinal knowledge in the Amazon, and in many societies throughout the world.  The women who are generally the keepers of traditions, the organizers of ceremonies and keen observers of planting calendars, all of which is tied to protecting the culture, maintaining agricultural diversity, and transmitting tradions to the next generation.  The talk will focus on the experiences of the Amazon Conservation Team in partnering with indigenous female leaders over the past 15 years.

Introduction by Dave Johnson 

12:30-1:30 p.m.

CONFERENCE LUNCHEON:  (Franklin Hall - Blue Ridge Mountain Room, upper level)

2:00 - 3:00 p.m.

ALUMNA ADDRESS:  (Franklin Hall – Panther’s Den)

DR. SANDRA VIA, ’04 – Ferrum College Assistant Professor of Political Science

 FINDING A VOICE: FROM STUDENT, TO TEACHER

 Introduction by David Howell

3:15 - 4:15 p.m.

AFTERNOON SESSION   (Franklin Hall – Panther’s Den) 

 “Are Women Human”:  A staged reading of the Dorothy Sayers essay performed by Helen Prien. 

On the 75th anniversary of its original presentation to a “Ladies Society,” acclaimed author Dorothy Sayers (as portrayed by Dr. Helen E. Prien) will revisit this lecture. Ms. Sayers examines  the “problem” of feminism from her witty, and somewhat wry, point of view. It will be followed by lively student discourse on its feminist and rhetorical elements. Where are we today?  Response and insights to be given by Kyle Zeller and Jessa King.

 Introduciton by Lana Whited 

4:30 - 5:30 p.m.  

Student Leadership Tea: (Franklin Hall - Virginia Room, lower level)

Cosponsored by the Smith Mountain Branch of the American Association of University Women, honoring Ferrum College’s female student leaders

Organizer: Leslie Holden