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E-term Courses

Experiential Term (E-Term) is a three week term at Ferrum College which offers a variety of two, three, and four credit hour courses that offer experiential opportunities which may apply to or enhance courses in the liberal arts core and some majors/minors. E-Term is offered three weeks immediately following graduation in May. For more information about E-Term (details, dates, deadlines, fees, etc.) go to main E-Term page.

 

School of Arts and Humanities

ENG 213

Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a grade of “C” or higher
Credit: 3 hr.
$96.00
Local Travel
ALLISON HARL
ENG 213: Literature and Film of the American Frontier - The objective of this course is to examine the American frontier with a particular emphasis on the western and anti-western novel as well as western and revisionist film. This course is designated as a sophomore literature course and meets the literature requirement in the Ferrum College Liberal Arts Core. It can fulfill three hours of the writing intensive requirement for graduation from Ferrum College, for students who take this course as their second sophomore literature course and earn a grade of C or higher in the course. Students cannot earn a grade of C or higher in this course unless they earn a C or better on the writing assignments required by the course.

ART 217

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
JAKE SMITH

SPA 451

Prerequisite: SPA 202 or permission of instructor
Credit: 3 hr.
PATTY SUPPES
$2700.00
*Travel Abroad (Mexico, passport required)
ART 217: Introduction to Photography; ART 317: Intermediate Photography - In this course we will work in partnership with Por un Mejor Hoy, an organization that connects US colleges with local service programs. Before traveling, students will have required readings and research about Mexican culture and history. Students will also plan a puppet program in advance to perform in Mexican schools and children’s homes, as an integral part of the coursework for the course.  Activities in Mexico: We will primarily be in three locations. We will begin our time in Mexico in the historic and diverse Mexico City, where we will collaborate with an NGO that works with street children. We will also meet with artists and traditional artisans, and visit museums and important archaeological sites. We will also visit the historic city of Cuernavaca, where we will visit historical sites, museums, and local markets. We will work at a children’s village and some schools, teaching the lessons we will have prepared in advance. Finally, we will travel to Oaxaca, a city known for its varied and rich artistic landscape. We will attend workshops and meet with local artists, visit markets, archaeological sites, and museums.
SPA 451: Directed Study - In this course we will work in partnership with Por un Mejor Hoy, an organization that connects US colleges with local service programs. Before traveling, students will have required readings and research about Mexican culture and history. Students will also plan a puppet program in advance to perform in Mexican schools and children’s homes, as an integral part of the coursework for the course.  Activities in Mexico: We will primarily be in three locations. We will begin our time in Mexico in the historic and diverse Mexico City, where we will collaborate with an NGO that works with street children. We will also meet with artists and traditional artisans, and visit museums and important archaeological sites. We will also visit the historic city of Cuernavaca, where we will visit historical sites, museums, and local markets. We will work at a children’s village and some schools, teaching the lessons we will have prepared in advance. Finally, we will travel to Oaxaca, a city known for its varied and rich artistic landscape. We will attend workshops and meet with local artists, visit markets, archaeological sites, and museums.
Both Courses: A passport is necessary; no visa is required for US citizens. No vaccinations or special medications are required. Registration for this course is by permission of the professor--interviews prior to registration are required.  Personal cameras will be determined appropriate or not for the course by the professor in the interview prior to registration. Students must be able to walk long distances, including climbing hills and stairs, and must be prepared for long days of physical activity.

REL 207/HHP 149

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 4 hr.
JAN NICHOLSON-ANGLE/SHANNON HARDWICKE
$2000.00
Regional (VA, NC, DC)
REL 207: The Spirit of Adventure: Vocation, Calling and Practice in the Methodist Tradition
HHP 149: Spirit of Adventure:  Finding Vocation through Spiritual Wellness
(Combined course description)
In this combined course students will, through lectures, reading, community engagement, and activities, gain a deeper awareness of Ferrum College’s roots in Methodism, as well as focus on the relationship between physical well-being and spiritual health. Students will gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for Methodism’s roots in social justice and education, spiritual and physical wellness, and accountability.  Research corroborates that physical activities and outdoor experiences are related to and supportive of spiritual wellness. This relationship will be explored through a variety of experiences and reflection.  Through a series of activities including yoga, meditation, cardio/muscular strength activities, outdoor experiences and community service, students will investigate the influence that fitness and recreation has on spiritual wellness.
REL 207 and HHP 149 are a clustered E-Term experience the chance to earn 4 credit hours. Students must sign up for both courses, fully participate, and pass both courses to receive E-term credit.

ENG 210

Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a grade of "C" or higher
Credit: 3 hr.
TINA HANLON
$95.00
Local Travel
ENG 210: World Folktales and Literature - This course examines the literary, cultural and social significance of folktales and their influence on other forms of literature. Common themes and images in folktales that link different cultures within Appalachia, America and the world are studied along with selections of classic literature. Topics include animal tales; quest stories; tricksters, rogues, and tall tale heroes; Sleeping Beauties, Cinderellas, and other heroines; magical, malicious, and monstrous encounters; Beauty and the Beast and other transformations; and humorous and satiric tales. Activities may include watching films, visiting archives and museums, meeting with authors, and observing storytellers.
This course is designated as a sophomore literature course and meets the literature requirement in the Ferrum College Liberal Arts Core. It can fulfill three hours of the writing intensive requirement for graduation from Ferrum College, for students who take this course as their second sophomore literature course and earn a grade of C or higher in the course. Students cannot earn a grade of C or higher in this course unless they earn a C or better on the writing assignments required by the course. This course provides IL (Integrated Learning) credit.

ENG 203

Prerequisite:  ENG 102 with a grade of “C” or higher
Credit: 3 hr.
JOHN CAREY

REL 207

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
DAVID HOWELL
$3500.00
*Travel Abroad - England (approximately 12 days). Passport required.
ENG 203:  British Literature I - Have you ever dreamed of visiting England?  Visit places that make the timeless pieces of literature that you will read come alive!  Imagine hiking a portion of the world-famous Canterbury pilgrimage, visiting the shrine of St. Thomas Becket, seeing one of Shakespeare’s plays at the renowned Globe Theatre, visiting the final resting place of notable writers in Westminster Abbey, and touring the Tower of London, where writers such as St. Thomas More, John Wilmot, Walter Raleigh, and Samuel Pepys were imprisoned!  ENG 203 will run simultaneously with REL 207, and all travel will be in conjunction with that course.  This course is designated as a sophomore literature course and meets the literature requirement in the Ferrum College Liberal Arts Core.  It can fulfill three hours of the writing intensive requirement for graduation from Ferrum College, for students who take this course as their second sophomore literature course and earn a grade of C or higher in the course.  Students cannot earn a grade of C or higher in this course unless they earn a C or better on the writing assignments required by this course.
REL 207: Globalizing Religion: Ritual and Pilgrimage to Canterbury
In medieval Europe, a pilgrimage to visit the tomb of Saint Thomas Becket in Canterbury was a popular pilgrimage route behind journeys to Rome, Jerusalem, and Santiago de Compestela. Such a journey was immortalized in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales as pilgrims regale each other with stories while they travel. But even before Becket, English pilgrims would stop in Canterbury on their way to Rome and visit the tombs of St. Augustine of Canterbury and Anselm. The site was considered sufficiently threatening that Becket’s shrine was destroyed by Henry VIII during the English Reformation. In this E-term course students will explore the historical context of this medieval pilgrimage and consider how theology, material artifacts, and ritual interact in pilgrimage. Because pilgrimage is a concretely physical or embodied type of spirituality, the approach will be interdisciplinary as students also consider ancient and modern literary accounts, history, museums, monuments, arts, and touristic practices.  We will walk the final 7 miles from Chilham to Canterbury Cathedral to have a taste of pilgrimage and consider ways in which pilgrimages are appropriated and interact with practices of tourism. Students will visit London, Oxford, and Windsor during the travel portion of the E-term course. Special attention in the course will be given to the religious and ritual dimensions of pilgrimage. This course will run simultaneously with ENG 203, and all travel will be in conjunction with that course. There are no prerequisites for REL 207. Course will fulfill General Education Religion/Philosophy requirement for Liberal Arts Core or Religion Major or Minor requirements.

ENG 207

Prerequisite: ENG 102 with a grade of “C” or higher
Credit: 3 hr.
MELVIN MACKLIN
$375.00
Local Travel
ENG 207: Representations of the Holocaust through Literature and Film - This course examines related literature and films to examine how and why the Holocaust came about, the leadership of the Nazi movement, and the motivations behind the unprecedented atrocities perpetrated on the East European Jews and other groups under Hitler’s reign.  This course is designated as a sophomore literature course and meets the Literature requirement in the Ferrum College Liberal Arts Core.  If a student takes a second sophomore literature course and earns a “C” or higher in it, the course may be used to fulfill three credits of the Writing Intensive graduation requirement for Ferrum College.  A student cannot earn a grade of “C” or higher in this course unless he or she earns a “C” or better on the writing assignments required by the course.

THA 205, 305, 405

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
GIUSEPPE RITORTO
$395.00
No Travel
THA 205, 305, 405: Applied Summer Theatre I, II, III - Intensive experience, open to all students, in one or more areas of production in a summer theatre environment. The emphasis will be placed on practical and sound approaches to theatre technique characterized by short rehearsal time and culminating in public performance.

School of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

ESC 205

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 4 hr.
Limit 18 Students
BOB POHLAD
CAROLYN THOMAS
$2700.00
*Abroad (St. John, USVI)
ESC 205: Tropical and Marine Ecology - This course is an introduction to the natural history and ecology of tropical island terrestrial and marine ecosystems on St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands. In the course, students will learn the principles of tropical and marine ecology through first-hand experience on a required two-week field experience in the US Virgin Islands. The vast majority of this course will be spent in the field and living in simple rustic campground cottages on the beach. Lectures and labs will take place in a tropical marine environment that is humid and buggy. Many hours each day will be in the water snorkeling both as a class and on individual projects Students will learn basic observational and sampling techniques and conduct their own research project. Students will be required to obtain a US passport at their own expense and must have basic swimming skills and be willing to snorkel and hike in moderately strenuous situations at times.  Students will swim in the college pool during the spring semester to prepare for the trip. 

AGS 290

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 4 hr.
Limit 12 Students
NANCY BRUBAKER
$850.00
Local/Regional Travel
AGS 290: Introduction to Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT) - This course is to offer the student a focused experience in the Equine Industry and to allow the student to experience the range of diversity in occupation that the Equine Industry offers. While the course focuses on the EAAT (Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies), the broader discussion of career prospects in the Equine Industry will welcome students studying in many departments and majors. Students will earn up to 120 educational hours that can be applied toward certifications for PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International,   EAGALA (Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association), QMHP (Qualified Mental Health Provider), CHA (Composite Horsemanship Association), and USHJA Instructor. All of the previous Certifications are for Instructors, trainers or Psychology/Social Work or Counseling areas.  You will learn about what it takes to receive some of the above certifications. Riding will a small part of this course, however any level rider is welcome.   Abundant hands on learning. Meals on field trips not provided.

MTH 105

Prerequisite: an "R" or passing grade (A, B, or C) in MTH 100
Credit: 3 hr.
JUSTIN ALLEN
$0
No Travel
MTH 105: Fundamentals of Mathematics - This course introduces Liberal Arts students to multiple topics in Mathematics. It helps students develop critical thinking skills; improve their ability to analyze and solve problems; and improve their use of mathematical skills and tools. Topics covered will include a combination of Number Systems, Algebra, Geometry, Probability and Statistics, and selected other topics. As an E-term course there is a greater opportunity for instruction and one-on-one interaction due to the concentrated format of the term.

MTH 106

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
BRIAN FALKNER
$0
No Travel
MTH 106: Math Manipulatives - This three week course offers students a "hands on" approach to mathematics.  Different areas of mathematics will be examined including, but not limited to, algebra, geometry, and calculus. Students' understanding will be demonstrated through presentations and/or demonstrations.

SCI 201

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 4 hr.
MARIA PUCCIO
$375.00
Local Travel
SCI 201: Food Science
Description: Food science is the applied science of the study of food.  In this course, you will learn the basic science behind food and cooking, the science of taste and smell, the science of metabolism and microorganisms, and the science behind many foods including dairy, fruits and vegetables, and meats.  This course begins with an overview of the necessary biology and chemistry, and thus is appropriate for both science and non-science majors. This course provides IL (Integrated Learning) credit.

BIO 123

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 4 hr.
GLEN STEVENS
$200.00
Local Travel
BIO 123: Introduction to Entomology Insects and Society - As a lab-based science course, the course is already experiential in nature.  During this E-Term course, students will spend substantial time outdoors on campus searching for insects, then identify those species in the lab.  For discussion of insects in the context of forestry, streams, forensic science, and agriculture, we will visit each of the relevant sites, and discuss the ecology of the site and how that relates to the insects groups we find.  Lectures and learning will take place in the field whenever practical.  In addition, we will also conduct visits to relevant local agencies or organizations (e.g., Virginia Tech Entomology Department, Novozymes Biologicals Inc. in Salem, the Virginia Museum of Natural History in Martinsville) that have an entomological focus.  Students will assemble an insect collection, which will require hands-on activity in the context of collecting, identifying, and preserving insect specimens.

School of Social Sciences and Professional Studies

PSY 298

Prerequisite: PSY 201 and Permission of the Professor
Credit: 3 hr.
ANGIE DAHL
$200.00
No Travel as a Class
PSY 298: Pre-Professional Placement - This course is designed to give students an opportunity to observe principles of psychology applied in practice in real-life settings.  Students will be involved in a community setting observing psychologists, physical therapists, social workers, personnel managers, behavior analysts, parole officers, counselors and/or other professionals in their work.  In the field of psychology, and other areas, students who are to compete for jobs upon graduation, or even for graduate school placement, are finding that they need to build professional skills through direct experience.  Although many programs have successful internship programs this course will offer students an opportunity to gain experience, possibly enrich their major, and “check out” the field in which they hope to be employed. This placement will require a minimum of 36 hours in the field.  Students must provide their own transportation to placements.  The fee includes a stipend to help cover food and gas during placement travel.

PSY 355

Prerequisite: PSY 201 or BIO 105 or 111
Credit:  3 hr.
MEGAN ST. PETERS
$220.00
Local/Regional Travel
PSY 355: Science of Sleep - This course will provide an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the central nervous system as it is related to sleep, explore the psychological and neurological impact of sleep deprivation on individuals, and engage students in research as they conduct a sleep experiment on themselves.

REC 372

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
Limit 10 Students
DAN CASTON
$1300.00
Regional (Down the James River, Virginia)
REC 372: Eco-Adventure - This course is a hands-on ecotourism and adventure experience that provides a case study of the relationship between tourism, recreation, history and the environment and its role in communities. Students and faculty will spend seven days paddling and camping on the upper James River in Virginia then travel by vehicle to other sites and locations along the river to the Chesapeake Bay. Students are expected to participate in a variety of adventure, cultural/historical and environmental activities that illustrate how tourism can promote local economic stimulus, environmental conservation and education.  This course offers students the opportunity to gain local, regional and global awareness and citizenship through a regionalized adventure based travel experience, compare and contrast the impacts (environmental, cultural, and economic) of ecotourism versus mass tourism, interact with local residents, learn how ecotourism is a useful economic development tool that promotes cultural and environmental conservation, and demonstrate personal responsibility by participating in leadership based adventure activities.  Students must be physically able to take on challenging activities throughout the entire 3 week course.

CJU 497

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
Limit 12 Students
WILLIAM OSBORNE
$400.00
Local/Regional Travel (Virginia and Eastern Tennessee)
CJU 497: Special Topics in Criminal Justice Topics in Institutional Corrections - This course takes an in depth look into prisons and jails (correctional institutions) and how varied they are depending on their custody level and the types of offenders they serve.  We will visit a variety of correctional facilities that range from minimum to maximum security at both the local and state levels.   Some prisons will house male   offenders, while some will house females, and one of the jails will house both. Field trips will be taken to the local court as well as a local probation and parole office. Prior to taking the field trips, we will watch a variety of classic films which are both fictional and documentary to help you understand the prison culture. Students will practice a play depicting prison life and its impact on prisoners, the correctional officers, and the families of prisoners and correctional officers. The play will be performed on campus and in a boot camp prison. There are several written assignments that include previews and reviews of all the agencies visited as well as critiques of all the films.

SWK 299

Prerequisite: SWK 201 and ENG 102 (with a “C” or higher, only students who have been accepted into the Social Work major through the formal acceptance process are eligible.
Credit: 3 hr.
JENNIE WEST
MARTHA HALEY-BOWLING
$45.00
No Travel as a Class
SWK 299: Introduction to Community Service - SWK 299 is an experiential course in which students participate in a structured community agency including 75 hours of volunteer service within the local social welfare delivery system.  Classroom seminar accompanies this initial experience in the field.  Most agency placements will be located in the general Rocky Mount area but some may be in surrounding counties.  Students will be responsible for covering their own transportation costs to get to their agency as well as their Field Seminar Workbook.  Students will maintain a daily journal to address specific aspects of their agency experience, create a PowerPoint presentation about the agency, as well as several additional assignments.  Students will be evaluated by their Field Instructor and Faculty liaison.  Students will be at their agency 3-4 days per week (for at least 25 hours a week) and attending class seminar at least 2 days each week.  They may be required to attend at least one evening agency meeting.  Students will also be able visit at least one additional local agency other than their primary placement to get cross exposure.  Students enrolled in this E-Term course are responsible for the following: a) complete a placement interest form by February; b) attend a meeting with instructor in March, prior to E-Term’s start; c) pay a fee by early March for a criminal background, recent TB test and DMV check completed; some agencies require a drug test; and d) interview and be accepted at an agency no later than mid-April. For students in the new 2012 SWK Major curriculum this course is an elective; for students in prior catalog this is a required course.  Students must meet the pre-requisite requirements and should discuss interest with instructor prior to registering for this course.

CJU 375

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
DAVID NICHOLSON
$1700.00
No Travel
CJU 375: Crime Scene Photography - This course examines the theory and techniques of forensic photography. Students will be introduced to digital photographic terminology, concepts, and techniques, and introduced to the use of photo editing software for analysis and interpretation of photographic evidence.  Following the completion of this course, participants will have experience in writing an acceptable protocol for a forensic scene photography event, understand why photography is important to forensic issues, understand the principles of light as light applies to forensic photography, be able to describe the basic concepts of perspective, depth of field, field of view, shutter speed, aperture setting, and ISO speed and explain the legal implications of digital images as probative evidence.  Photographic equipment will be provided for this course.

CSC 290

Prerequisite: None
Credit: 3 hr.
TAIWO AJANI
$1550
Local/Regional Travel
CSC 290 – Selected Topics: Data of Things and You - This course introduces the student to state-of-the-arts concepts and technologies surrounding data, internet of things (IoT) and cybersecurity their wide application and relevance in a society and job environment in which the student will soon be taking an active role. It is designed around themes that the students are able to relate to including the social media while borrowing domain specific ideas from the students’ major. It provides students with strategic knowledge to understand the implication of data and the cyber space for national security. Students will develop a strong foundation in 21st century decision making tools and cyber-threats as well as be prepared to work effectively in work teams bound to experience and or encounter big data, analytics and cybersecurity issues. The course combines all-encompassing topic coverage, by using methods such as visualization, available electronic devices, chats, experiential learning, and active learning: peer instruction, discussion groups and collaborative work to present a student-friendly introductory course in Cyber-Data literacy. The experiential component amongst others will include authoritative information from seasoned experts, powerful instructor resources, and real-world student applications. Adopted text combines expertise from an array of international experts in law enforcement, national security, life & natural sciences, law, as well as computer sciences, criminology, linguistics, and psychology, creating a unique cross-disciplinary collection of knowledge and insights in emerging global issue. Students will be encouraged to work together in teams to provide model solutions to real life issues of their choice.

SOC 392/EPD 392

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing
Credit: 3 hr.
SUSAN MEAD
$700.00
Regional (Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky)
SOC 392/EPD 392: Eco-Social Justice: Issues and Applications - The Ferrum College Mission Statement calls students to demonstrate that they are “caring and concerned citizens of their community, nation, and world”; this course is designed to encourage students to explore how they and others take on this role in society. In this experiential course, students will examine social inequalities related to environmental issues, as well as explore social movements and paths for community action to address these issues. Class discussion and oral presentations will be the primary modes of in-class instruction, based on assignments from books, internet exploration, and film sources. In addition, students will engage in a 9 day field trip to the Appalachian coalfield regions of Virginia, West Virginia, and Kentucky, where they will see first-hand the environmental issues we have studied and meet citizens working to bring about social justice related to those issues.