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E-term Courses

Experiential Term (E-Term) is a three week term at Ferrum College which offers a variety of two, three, and four credit hour courses that offer experiential opportunities which may apply to or enhance courses in the liberal arts core and some majors/minors. E-Term is offered three weeks immediately following graduation in May. For more information about E-Term (details, dates, deadlines, fees, etc.) go to main E-Term page.

COURSES OFFERED FOR E-TERM 2016


ACC 202: Principles of Accounting II

Basic elements of the accounting process for planning budgeting and control and their application to various forms of business.  Also included are financial analysis and concepts of cost, including the effects of cost on revenues, profits, asset values, and capital budgeting decisions.

Instructor: Professor Jason Sharp
Pre-requisite: ACC 201
Travel: no travel
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $0

AGS 218: Regional Experiences in Agriculture

What is the face of agriculture going to look like in the 21st century? This is a critical question as we strive to resolve agriculture's ongoing identity crisis: factory farming to feed the masses, ecological farming to preserve the environment, or both? This requires a thoughtful dialog on agricultural "sustainability" - the environmental, social, and economic factors that determine the long-term resilience of farming systems. This immersive course is designed to examine these factors, using Virginia's diversified systems as a backdrop. Guest speakers, travel, and field exercises will illuminate fundamental concepts. A service learning component may be included. Course delivery will be supplemented with readings and a capstone project evaluating the sustainability of a selected agricultural system. Students from all backgrounds and majors are encouraged to enroll.

Instructor: Dr. Tim Durham
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: local and regional travel
Credit: 4 hr.
Fee: $1350.00

AGS 290: Introduction to Equine-Assisted Activities and Therapies (EAAT)

This course is to offer the student a focused experience in the Equine Industry and to allow the student to experience the range of diversity in occupation that the Equine Industry offers. While the course focuses on the EAAT (Equine Assisted Activities and Therapies), the broader discussion of career prospects in the Equine Industry will welcome students studying in many departments and majors. Students will earn up to 120 educational  hours that can be applied toward certifications for PATH (Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship) International,   EAGALA (Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association), QMHP(Qualified Mental Health Provider), CHA(Composite Horsemanship Association) , and USHJA Instructor. All of the previous Certifications are for Instructors, trainers or Psychology/Social Work or Counseling areas.  You will learn about what it takes to receive some of the above  certifications. Riding will a small part of this course, however any level rider is welcome.   Abundant hands on learning. Limit 12 students, meals on field trips not provided.

Instructor: Dr. Nancy Brubaker
Prerequisites: None
Travel: local and regional travel
Credit: 4 hr.
Fee: $850.00

ART 217: Introduction to Photography; ART 317: Intermediate Photography

In this course we will work in partnership with Por un Mejor Hoy, an organization that connects US colleges with local service programs. Before traveling, students will have required readings and research about Mexican culture and history. Students will also plan a puppet program in advance to perform in Mexican schools and children’s homes, as an integral part of the coursework for the course.  Activities in Mexico: We will primarily be in two locations. We will begin our time in Mexico in the historic and diverse Mexico City, where we will collaborate with an NGO that works with street children. We will also meet with artists and traditional artisans, and visit museums and important archaeological sites. We will work at a children’s village and some schools, teaching the lessons we will have prepared in advance. Finally, we will travel to Oaxaca, a city known for its varied and rich artistic landscape. We will attend workshops and meet with local artists, visit markets, archaeological sites, and museums.

A passport is necessary; no visa is required for US citizens. No vaccinations or special medications are required. Registration for this course is by permission of the professor--interviews prior to registration are required.  Personal cameras will be determined appropriate or not for the course by the professor in the interview prior to registration.

Students must be able to walk long distances, including climbing hills and stairs, and must be prepared for long days of physical activity.

Instructor: Professor Jacob Smith
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: travel abroad (Mexico, passport required)
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $2700.00

(Travel safety will be determined at the beginning of the course and could cause a revision of course plans or cancellation.)

COM 211: Radio Broadcasting Methods

This course will familiarize students with the structure and design of radio program formats.  Students will learn to create and produce radio programs through developmental writing and practical on-air experience.  Students will also design daily broadcast and commercial programming schedules.  Analysis of a variety of radio programs will include both the content and business paradigms of present day radio broadcasts.  Although this course will spend most of the time on campus, some local travel is possible.  Students will live and breathe radio broadcasting by working full days at Ferrum Radio to create and produce radio programs, IDs, PSAs, Promotional spots, and commercial advertisements.  Students will also experience the managerial aspects of radio broadcasting by working on scheduling and coordination of content.             

Instructor: Dr. Karl Roeper
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: local/regional travel (Virginia)
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $95.00

CJU 375: Crime Scene Photography

This course examines the theory and techniques of forensic photography. Students will be introduced to digital photographic terminology, concepts, and techniques, and introduced to the use of photo editing software for analysis and interpretation of photographic evidence.  Following the completion of this course, participants will have experience in writing an acceptable protocol for a forensic scene photography event, understand why photography is important to forensic issues, understand the principles of light as light applies to forensic photography, be able to describe the basic concepts of perspective, depth of field, field of view, shutter speed, aperture setting, and ISO speed and explain the legal implications of digital images as probative evidence.  Photographic equipment will be provided for this course.

Instructor: Dr. David Nicholson
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: no travel
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $1600.00

CJU 497: Special Topics in Criminal Justice - Topics in Institutional Corrections

This course takes an in depth look into prisons and jails (correctional institutions) and how varied they are depending on their custody level and the types of offenders they serve.  We will visit a variety of correctional facilities that range from minimum to maximum security at both the local and state levels.   Some prisons will house male   offenders, while some will house females, and one of the jails will house both. Field trips will be taken to the local court as well as a local probation and parole office. Prior to taking the field trips, we will watch a variety of classic films which are both fictional and documentary to help you understand the prison culture. Students will practice a play depicting prison life and its impact on prisoners, the correctional officers, and the families of prisoners and correctional officers. The play will be performed on campus and in a boot camp prison. There are several written assignments that include previews and reviews of all the agencies visited as well as critiques of all the films. The course has a maximum of 12 students.

Instructor: Dr. William Osborne
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: local and regional travel (Virginia and Eastern Tennessee)
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $400.00

EDU 147: Special Topics; Diverse Student Populations as Portrayed in Visual Media

Through this course, students will examine the impact that specific disabilities have on individuals’ lives and on the lives of their families.   Students will explore a variety of disability-related issues, and will complete assigned readings and view media presentations (for example, movies, documentaries, YouTube, and streaming media) to create a basis for discussion and informal research.  Based on their research they will develop a presentation to support or refute assumptions based on the media presentations.  Students will discuss characteristics, definitions, and appropriate school intervention for students. Field trips to selected facilities in the region will allow students to observe and interact with special populations and with professionals working in those fields.

Instructor: Professor Nancy Beach
Pre-requisite: SPD 220 or permission of instructor
Travel: regional travel (Virginia)
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $225.00

ENG 210: World Folktales and Literature

This course examines the literary, cultural and social significance of folktales and their influence on other forms of literature. Common themes and images in folktales that link different cultures within Appalachia, America and the world are studied along with selections of classic literature. Topics include animal tales; quest stories; tricksters, rogues, and tall tale heroes; Sleeping Beauties, Cinderellas, and other heroines; magical, malicious, and monstrous encounters; Beauty and the Beast and other transformations; and humorous and satiric tales. Activities may include watching films, visiting archives and museums, meeting with authors, and observing storytellers.

This course is designated as a sophomore literature course and meets the literature requirement in the Ferrum College Liberal Arts Core. It can fulfill three hours of the writing intensive requirement for graduation from Ferrum College, for students who take this course as their second sophomore literature course and earn a grade of C or higher in the course. Students cannot earn a grade of C or higher in this course unless they earn a C or better on the writing assignments required by the course.

Instructor: Dr. Tina Hanlon
Pre-requisite: ENG 102 with a grade of "C" or higher
Travel: local travel
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $95.00

ESC 205: Rainforest to Reef; Resource Management in Belize

This course is an introduction to the geology, taxonomy, ecology, and management of tropical terrestrial and marine ecosystems.  In this course, students will learn the principles of tropical and marine ecology during a two-week field course in Belize, a stable English-speaking democracy in Central America.  We will travel from rainforest to reef. We will focus on both the ecology of the ecosystems and how local community-based organizations in Belize work to manage ecosystems sustainably.  Issues in Belize such as wildlife conservation, jaguar ecology, biodiversity, sustainable forestry, and ecotourism will be covered in detail.  Students will learn while hiking, caving, birding, snorkeling the world’s second-longest barrier reef, exploring Mayan ruins, and studying the local and indigenous cultures.  Lectures and labs will take place in the field.  Students will be required to have a US passport and some immunizations. (Limit of 15 students in course)

Instructor: Dr. Glen Stevens
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: abroad (approx. 15 days, passport required, Belize)
Credits: 4 hr.
Fee: $3000.00

(Travel safety will be determined at the beginning of the course and could cause a revision of course plans or cancellation.)

ESC 208: Ireland’s Natural History: Interaction of Nature and Culture

This E-Term course is designed for the study of the unique natural history of Ireland and the effects on the Irish people and their culture. This course begins with two days of class on campus followed by a two-week travel component through the countryside of Northern Ireland, United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland.  Students will pick a topic to study related to Irish natural history and culture during the course, upon return to campus students will be required to complete a paper and present their results in an oral presentation.  Airfare, in-country travel and entry fees to venues are included in costs, as well as a daily big Irish breakfast.  Other expenses such as lunches, dinners and personal items are the responsibility of the student.

Instructors: Dr. Bob Pohlad and Dr. Carolyn Thomas
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: abroad (approx. 2 weeks, passport required, Ireland)
Credits: 4 hr.
Fee: $3500.00

(Travel safety will be determined at the beginning of the course and could cause a revision of course plans or cancellation.)

ESC 390: Herpetology

A comprehensive study of the biology, ecology, conservation and natural history of amphibians and reptiles.  Students will spend much of this course in the field learning species-habitat relationships and becoming familiar with common species in southwestern Virginia.  Students will become familiar with different sampling and capture techniques used in herpetological research. Students will spend much of this course in the field learning species-habitat relationships and becoming familiar with amphibians and reptiles in southwestern Virginia.

Instructor: Dr. Todd Fredericksen
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: regional travel
Credits: 4 hr.
Fee: $50.00

HIS 303: The American Revolution

Students will expand their understanding of the American Revolution during a

guided tour of important historical sites in New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Discussions, lectures, and multimedia presentations on campus and during travel will enable students to appreciate the geographical, architectural, and topographical context of the American Revolution and allow them to process the information they gather at the sites. Specially selected readings will help students maximize on-site learning. Tests will be administered daily during the tour, and analytical papers will be submitted during the on-campus portions of the course.

Instructor: Dr. Michael Trochim
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: regional travel (9 days, 7 nights, eastern US)
Credits: 3 hr.
Fee: $800.00

MTH 105: Fundamentals of Mathematics

This course introduces Liberal Arts students to multiple topics in Mathematics. It helps students develop critical thinking skills; improve their ability to analyze and solve problems; and improve their use of mathematical skills and tools. Topics covered will include a combination of Number Systems, Algebra, Geometry, Probability and Statistics, and selected other topics. As an E-term course there is a greater opportunity for instruction and one-on-one interaction due to the concentrated format of the term.                                                                         

Instructor: Professor Justin J. Allen
Pre-requisite: an "R" or passing grade (A,B, or C) in MTH 100
Travel: none
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $0  

MTH 106: Math Manipulatives

This three week course offers students a "hands on" approach to mathematics.  Different areas of mathematics will be examined including, but not limited to, algebra, geometry, and calculus. Students' understanding will be demonstrated through presentations and/or demonstrations.

Instructor: Dr. Bryan Faulkner
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: none
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $0

PSY 298: Pre-Professional Placement

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to observe principles of psychology applied in practice in real-life settings.  Students will be involved in a community setting observing psychologists, psychotherapists, social workers, personnel managers, behavior analysts, parole officers, and counselors in their work.  In the field of psychology, and other areas, students who are to compete for jobs upon graduation, or even for graduate school placement, are finding that they need to build professional skills through direct experience.  Although many programs have successful internship programs this course will offer students an opportunity to gain experience, possibly enrich their major, and “check out” the field in which they hope to be employed. This placement will require a minimum of 36 hours in the field.  Students must provide their own transportation to placements.  The fee includes a stipend to help cover food and gas during placement travel.

Instructor: Dr. Angie Dahl
Pre-requisite: PSY 201 and permission of the instructor
Travel: none as a class
Credit: 3 hr
Fee: $200.00                                 

ECT: Cultural and Heritage Tourism (Guatemala)

REC 391 is an in-depth exploration of cultural tourism in the living Maya Highlands of Guatemala. Local examples of existing cultural sites and ecotourism destinations will be used as case studies to show the effectiveness of using community-based tourism as a tool for local economic development, strengthening community, and preserving culture/nature. Additional topics will include the Maya cosmovision (religion, ceremonies, traditions, customs and legends), as well as today’s cultural and ecotourism industries, marketing and market segmentation, and the design and programming cultural and ecotourism tours. Students must be physically able to take on challenging activities throughout the entire 3 week course.  Course limited to 12 students.

Instructor: Dr. Chris Mayer
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: abroad (Guatemala, approx. 2.5 weeks, passport required)
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $3,000.00

(Travel safety will be determined at the beginning of the course and could cause a revision of course plans or cancellation.)

*REL 207/HHP 149: Spirit of Adventure (REL 207: The Spirit of Adventure: Vocation, Calling and Practice in the Methodist Tradition) (HHP 149: Spirit of Adventure:  Finding Vocation through Spiritual Wellness)

In this combined course students will, through lectures, reading, community engagement, and activities, gain a deeper awareness of Ferrum College’s roots in Methodism, as well as focus on the relationship between physical well-being and spiritual health. Students will gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for Methodism’s roots in social justice and education, spiritual and physical wellness, and accountability.  Research corroborates that physical activities and outdoor experiences are related to and supportive of spiritual wellness. This relationship will be explored through a variety of experiences and reflection.  Through a series of activities including yoga, meditation, cardio/muscular strength activities, outdoor experiences and community service, students will investigate the influence that fitness and recreation has on spiritual wellness.

REL 207 and HHP 149 are a clustered E-Term experience offering students the chance to earn 4 credit hours. Students must sign up for both courses, fully participate, and pass both courses to receive E-term credit.

Instructor(s): Dr. Jan Nicholson, Dr. Shannon Hardwicke, Dr. Chris Harnish
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: regional (VA, NC, DC)
Credit: 4 hr.
Fee: $2000.00

SWK 299: Introduction to Community Service

SWK 299 is an experiential course in which students participate in a structured community agency including 75 hours of volunteer service within the local social welfare delivery system.  Classroom seminar accompanies this initial experience in the field.  Most agency placements will be located in the general Rocky Mount area but some may be in surrounding counties.  Students will be responsible for covering their own transportation costs to get to their agency as well as their Field Seminar Workbook.  Students will maintain a daily journal to address specific aspects of their agency experience, create a PowerPoint presentation about the agency, as well as several additional assignments.  Students will be evaluated by their Field Instructor and Faculty Liason.  Students will be at their agency 3-4 days per week (for at least 25 hours a week) and attending class seminar at least 2 days each week.  They may be required to attend at least one evening agency meeting.  Students will also be able visit at least one additional local agency other than their primary placement to get cross exposure.  Students enrolled in this E-Term course are responsible for the following: a) complete a placement interest form by February;  b) attend a meeting with instructor in March, prior to E-Term’s start;  c) pay a fee by early March for a criminal background, recent TB test and DMV check completed; some agencies require a drug test; and d) interview and be accepted at an agency no later than mid-April. For students in the new 2012 SWK Major curriculum this course is an elective; for students in prior catalog this is a required course.  Students must meet the pre-requisite requirements and should discuss interest with instructor prior to registering for this course.

Instructor: Professor Jennie B. West or Professor Martha Haley-Bowling
Pre-requisite: SWK 201 and ENG 102 (with a "C" or higher, only students who have been accepted into the Social Work major through the formal acceptance process are eligible.
Travel: none as a class
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $45.00

SOC 450: Changing Roles over the Life Course

This course is designed to be a study of the changing social roles we experience as we age. 

Topics will include comparison of differing populations around the world with emphasis on aging in American Culture and social norms.  Experiential learning activities will focus on student interaction with community elders during weekly group setting visitations and oral history collection.  Students will produce an abbreviated autobiographical collection of their experiences during the course.

Instructor: Professor Peg Wimmer
Pre-requisite: SOC 101 or SOC 202 and JR standing
Travel: local
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $200.00                               

SPA 451: Directed Study: Culture and Service in Mexico

In this course we will work in partnership with Por un Mejor Hoy, an organization that connects US colleges with local service programs. Before traveling, students will have required readings and research about Mexican culture and history. Students will also plan a puppet program in advance to perform in Mexican schools and children’s homes, as an integral part of the coursework for the course.  Activities in Mexico: We will primarily be in two locations. We will begin our time in Mexico in the historic and diverse Mexico City, where we will collaborate with an NGO that works with street children. We will also meet with artists and traditional artisans, and visit museums and important archaeological sites. We will work at a children’s village and some schools, teaching the lessons we will have prepared in advance. Finally, we will travel to Oaxaca, a city known for its varied and rich artistic landscape. We will attend workshops and meet with local artists, visit markets, archaeological sites, and museums.

A passport is necessary; no visa is required for US citizens. No vaccinations or special medications are required. Registration for this course is by permission of the professor--interviews prior to registration are required.

Students must be able to walk long distances, including climbing hills and stairs, and must be prepared for long days of physical activity.

Instructor: Dr. Patricia Sagasti Suppes
Pre-requisite: SPA 451 will need SPA 202 or have permission of instructor
Travel: travel abroad (Mexico, passport required)
Credit: 3 hr.
Fee: $2700.00

(Travel safety will be determined at the beginning of the course and could cause a revision of course plans or cancellation.)

THA 205, 305, 405: Applied Summer Theatre – I, II, III

Intensive experience, open to all students, in one or more areas of production in a summer theatre environment. The emphasis will be placed on practical and sound approaches to theatre technique characterized by short rehearsal time and culminating in public performance.

Instructor: Professor Giuseppe Ritorto
Pre-requisite: none
Travel: none
Credits: 3 hr.
Fee: $395.00

*IMPORTANT Deadlines for E-Term  2015/2016*

  • Students must register for an E-Term course when registering for the spring semester; however, they register for a minimum of 12 hours for the regular spring semester as an E-term course will not count in the spring hours.  Registration for spring semester is November 9-13, 2015.
  • A non-refundable deposit of $500.00 is required for courses with a fee of $2000 or more and is due no later than December 8, 2015 to student accountsDeposits not paid by this deadline will result in the E-Term course being dropped from the student’s schedule.  E-Term travel scholarships granted will also be permanently lost should the dropping of an E-Term class becomes necessary for failure to pay the deposit and/or dropping the course for any reason. 
  • Applications for need-based scholarships for ONE E-Term travel course with a fee over $2000 will be available during registration for spring semester classes (students may only receive one E-term scholarship as they pursue their undergraduate degree). Arrangements for any other financial aid help must be addressed now with the financial aid office.  Deadline for the scholarship application is November 13, 2015E-Term travel scholarships may only be applied to costs for E-Term travel and will be rescinded if the student does not actually go on the trip, leaving the student fully responsible for the travel fee.  E-Term travel scholarships are not available for E-Term travel classes beyond the number of E-Term classes required to graduate.  Students receiving any other college sponsored scholarship to be applied to an E-Term travel course are not eligible to receive this need-based scholarship.
  • The last day to drop an E-term class is February 5, 2016.
  • Students are obligated for all course fees if still enrolled after February 5, 2016.  If a student withdraws after February 5, 2016, and therefore loses an E-Term travel scholarship that might have been granted, the student is still obligated for the full course fee.
  • Arrangements to pay outstanding student account balances for the fall semester must be in place and current to register for an E-term course.  Arrangements must also be in place to cover spring semester balances (including the E-term class), prior to spring semester check-in.  The cost of E-Term is part of the charges for the spring semester and the balance in full (if no other pending sources – Scholarships, Loans, Tuition Management Systems payment plans, etc) is due December 15, 2015.
  • Unless already awarded a need-based scholarship to help offset some of the cost of E-term travel, arrangements to cover the entire cost must be made.  Students will not be allowed to participate in an E-term course unless all prearranged financial obligations have been satisfied.
  • Students enrolled in a May 2016 E-Term course on or after February 5, 2016  will be obligated to pay travel related expenses and/or the full course fee whether or not they ultimately participate in the E-Term experience.
  • Students taking any additional E-Term courses (i.e., over the number required in the catalog for the year they enrolled) will incur an additional tuition fee of $615.00 per credit hour for the course.  If the course is not dropped by the set drop date (e.g., Feb. 5, 2016 for May 2016 E-Term courses) the student will be obligated to pay all travel related expenses and/or published course fees.
  • The $500 deposit is forfeited if a student drops/withdraws from any E-Term class after December 8, 2015.
  • If a student adds an E-Term class, that requires a deposit, after December 8, 2015, they must pay the $500 deposit (required for courses with a fee of $2,000 or more) prior to the E-Term course being added to their schedule. The last day to add an E-term class is Friday, January 15, 2016.  Students who register for an E-Term class after spring semester check-in must also have payment arrangements in place immediately to cover E-Term fees.

Loan options for payment of E-Term may be available. Students MUST contact the Financial Aid Office for more information. All applications and appropriate documentation must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office before April 12, 2016 for timely processing.