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Honors (HON)

Honors (HON)

100 Cornerstone Seminar: Perspectives on Leadership (replaces GWS 101 for Honors students)
The cornerstone seminar serves as an introduction to liberal arts learning for honors students by examining the topic of leadership.  Interdisciplinary in nature and writing intensive in structure, this seminar asks students to wrestle with the question “what does it mean to be a leader?”  Students will explore this question from a variety of different perspectives including the history of leadership theory, ethics and leadership, social and psychological dimensions of leaders and followers, critical thinking, and skills of leadership.  Prerequisite: Boone Honors program member.
Three hours, three credits.

205 Decision-Making and Problem Solving with Mathematics (meets Math)
This course provides a solid basis in logic and problem-solving with an emphasis on decision-making.  Specifically, the course uses Symbolic Logic to find valid/invalid arguments, Graphs and Networks to find efficient routes, Statistics to analyze data and trends, Algebra and Linear Systems to find solutions, break-even points and optimal points, and Voting and Apportionment to study social choice and fair division.  Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member or a grade of “B” or higher in Math 100 or higher.
Three hours, three credits.

206 The Bible and The Arts (meets a non-Bible Religion)
An interdisciplinary course that explores how the Bible has functioned as a classic text in western culture.  The course will consider the reception history of selected biblical texts in literature, film, drama, the visual arts, and the musical arts.  Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or English 102 and permission of instructor. 
Three hours, three credits.

210 Reason and the Individual (meets Literature or History)
This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the English-speaking world in the eighteenth century when individualism and rationalism emerged as dominant paradigms of the transatlantic community.  Through in-depth study of some of the leading figures in this emerging worldview, students will come to appreciate more fully their roles as individuals in modern society.  Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or English 102 and permission of instructor.
Three hours, three credits.

211 Art, Literature, and Film of the Expressionist Period (meets Literature or Fine Arts)
This interdisciplinary course will explore the world of expressionist art as produced in Europe and America during the period 1890-1937.  The mood of alienation between the avant garde and the middle class is a key feature of the art of this period.  Students will have the opportunity to explore the philosophical, cultural, and political background that helped to foster this alienation and led artists to produce the characteristically distorted look of expressionist art.  The emphasis in the course will be on analyzing visual art, film, drama, and fiction that the leading expressionists produced.  Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or English 102 and permission of instructor.
Three hours, three credits.

212 Music Inspired by Art (meets Fine Arts)
An interdisciplinary study of music composed to illuminate the visual arts.  A survey is made of classical, popular, and jazz compositions inspired by the lives and works of important visual artists throughout history.  Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or English 102 and permission of instructor.
Three hours, three credits.

213 Media and Violence
An interdisciplinary, team-taught, writing-intensive study of the relationship between media and violence.  The emphasis of the course will be on how violence is depicted in news and entertainment media, how media depictions of violence affect society, how social scientists study these effects, and how the problems associated with media and violence might be addressed.
This course is designated Writing Intensive; a grade of “C” or higher in this course is required for this course to count toward the six-credit-hour Writing Intensive graduation requirement for Ferrum College.  A student cannot earn a grade of “C” or higher in this course unless he or she earns a “C” or better on the writing assignments required by the course. Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or a grade of “C” of higher in English 102 and permission of instructor.
Three hours, three credits.

216 The Sixties
The Sixties is an interdisciplinary course that explores the political, cultural, and scientific changes that marked this turbulent and influential decade in American history. Our discussions will cover topics ranging from presidential decisions to popular culture.  We’ll look carefully at the operations of the U. S. government in both domestic (Great Society) and foreign (Cold War and Vietnam War) policy; we’ll also consider the challenges to the status quo posed by the Civil Rights Movement, the student anti-war movement, and the Women’s Movement.  We’ll learn about the “race in space” that culminated in the lunar landing.  In addition, we’ll explore changes in cultural values represented in literature and journalism, the visual arts, and music.
This course is designated Writing Intensive; a grade of “C” or higher in this course is required for this course to count toward the six-credit-hour graduation requirement for Ferrum College.  A student cannot earn a grade of “C” or higher in this course unless he or she earns a “C” or better on the writing assignments required by the course. Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or a grade of “C” of higher in English 102 and permission of instructor.   
Three hours, three credits.


220 Freedom (meets History or Political Science)
A philosophical and historical inquiry into the various concepts and forms of human freedom, and the conditions that make human freedom possible, from prehistory to the present day.  Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or English 102 and permission of instructor.
Three hours, three credits.

225 Religion and Science: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives (meets Religion or Science)
This interdisciplinary team-taught seminar is designed to help students become critically informed about some of the ways theistic religion and science are being perceived as relating to one another.  Students will explore 1) the history of the religion-science relationship, 2) various contemporary ways of thinking about the relationship between religion and science, 3) current theories of cosmology, evolutionary biology, molecular biology, ecology, and their implications for theological discourse.  Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or English 102 and permission of instructor.
Three hours, three credits.

435 Values and Vocation
Capstone honors seminar that asks students to explore the connections between values, talents, and career choices. 
This course is designated Writing Intensive; a grade of “C” or higher in this course is required for this course to count toward the six-credit-hour Writing Intensive graduation requirement for Ferrum College.  A student cannot earn a grade of “C” or higher in this course unless he or she earns a “C” or better on the writing assignments required by the course. Prerequisites: Boone Honors program member, or English 102 and permission of instructor.
Three hours, three credits.